White chocolate experiment: four dairy free mousses

White chocolate experiment

White chocolate experiment

 

White chocolate sauce

White chocolate sauce

Stiff egg whites

Stiff egg whites

beaters with stiff egg whites clinging to them

beaters with stiff egg whites clinging to them

When I made my Super Bowl cookies last month, I only used two of the three packages of Oppenheimer Vegan White Chocolate Chips I had bought.  I was puzzling over what to do with the chips, when I thought of the wonderful chocolate mousse I made from a recipe in Barbara Kafka’s Intolerant Gourmet cookbook.  While her recipe calls for bittersweet chocolate, would it work to substitute white chocolate, with its higher sugar content?

To add to the experiment, I just couldn’t imagine making only one kind of mousse.  The white chocolate by itself, I thought, might be boring.  But what if I added other flavors, and what if I made four different kinds? I could put them into my lovely mini ceramic pie pans to set in the refrigerator.  And even if one or two of the varieties were not so successful, odds are a couple would be.  I decided the flavors I would make would be: pumpkin, peanut butter, coconut and key lime.

Before I tell you how they came out, let me give you the recipe I followed.  I adjusted my chocolate sauce a bit from Ms. Kafka’s recipe; but otherwise, I have retained the spirit of what she has created, i.e., folding stiff egg whites into chocolate sauce made with coconut milk.

Dairy Free Mousse, 4 ways

White Chocolate Sauce
1 pkg. (10.5 ounces) white chocolate chips
2 cups coconut milk
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/4 cup sugar

Put coconut milk and chocolate chips into the top half of a double boiler, bring water in the bottom half to a boil and stir chips and coconut milk.  Keep stirring just until the chips are well on their way to being melted.  Take the double boiler off the burner and keep stirring – the remaining heat will be more than enough to melt the chips the rest of the way.  You are going to be letting the mixture cool to room temperature, so you don’t want to heat it too much, which would lengthen your wait for the mixture to be cool enough to mix with the egg whites.

Meanwhile, take 4 eggs that are at room temperature, separate the whites from the yolks, and beat with a hand mixer until stiff – when they are stiff, you can take the beaters out of the whites, turn the mixer sideways, and the peaks of egg white stuck to the beaters will not bow to gravity and bend – it will stick straight out (more or less) – as in my picture above.

Pumpkin mousse

Pumpkin mousse

Pumpkin mousse
½ cup white chocolate sauce
¼ cup pumpkin puree
½ tsp cinnamon
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 whipped egg white

Add pumpkin puree, cinnamon, maple syrup to white chocolate sauce in a medium mixing bowl.  Mix thoroughly together.  Now take a scoop of egg whites and slowly gently fold into pumpkin mixture, until well incorporated.  Do the same with a second scoop of egg whites – use about 1/4 of the mixture, or 1 egg white, for each mousse.  Pour the resulting mixture into a ceramic bowl and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.

The instructions for the following 3 mousses is pretty much the same – mix the sauce with the flavorings, fold the egg white into it, transfer to bowl and refrigerate.  Here are the ingredients.

 

Peanut butter fudge mousse

Peanut butter fudge mousse

Triple coconut mousse

Triple coconut mousse

Key lime mousse

Key lime mousse

Peanut butter fudge mousse
½ cup white chocolate sauce
¼ cup peanut butter
1 tbsp. maple syrup
1 whipped egg white

I added the word “fudge” to the description on Therese’s suggestion, since it is nice and thick and fudgy.

Triple Coconut Mousse
¾ cup white chocolate sauce
¼ to ½ cup sweetened coconut
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 whipped egg white

I called this one “triple coconut” due to the fact that it contains coconut milk, sweetened coconut (meat) and coconut oil.

Key Lime Mousse
½ cup white chocolate sauce
Zest and juice of one lime
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 whipped egg white

So which mousses came out the best, and which (if any) fell short of being completely satisfying?  The white envelope, please… For me, the peanut butter was the best, both in terms of flavor and a thick firm consistency.  Therese loved the pumpkin, and I would say it came in second for me.  The consistency was nice and silky, but a bit on the thin side.

The coconut also had a nice silky texture, with the sweetened coconut adding a bit of chewiness to it.  So that leaves the key lime as coming in last.  Indeed, it was the least successful.  Like my key lime pie experiment weeks ago, it was too thin, more soup than mousse.  It needed a little more thickening agent than the egg white.  But it did taste very good, so I wasn’t completely disappointed with that one.

While investigating what to make from my white chocolate chips, I encountered Hannah Kaminsky’s post “the White Stuff” about making your own vegan white chocolate, and her information about the March 14th “White Day” holiday.  Popular in Asian countries (especially Japan), on White Day, men traditionally give women white chocolate (after women have given men dark chocolate on Valentine’s Day a month earlier).  More recently, the holiday has adapted to the times, and one Japanese woman reports that some men, instead of giving white chocolate, give their female co-workers things like lingerie.  In any case, I was encouraged to think that in making these white chocolate mousses, I might be right in time to celebrate White Day (several days early I guess, but almost in time).

Mousses chilling

Mousses chilling

About Karl Peterson

Avid traveler, passionate about food and food-related entertainment, completely allergic to dairy. Trained musician with degrees from Columbia University and Wagner College. Longtime legal support person, now seeking to express my creative side.
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One Response to White chocolate experiment: four dairy free mousses

  1. Pingback: Perfecting Dairy Free Key Lime White Chocolate Mousse | The Dairy Free Traveler

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